Theatre Reviews, News & Interviews

Betrayal (Theatre Royal, Bath)  

Rating:

Verdict: Pinteresting 

Love From A Stranger (Theatre Royal, Windsor)

Rating:

Verdict: Who do you think you are kidding Mr Covid?  

A Midsummer Night's Dream (Flute Theatre (flutetheatre.co.uk)

Rating:

Verdict: Shakespeare for autistic people

Harold Pinter is a good choice for socially distanced theatre. The characters in his plays usually like to tantalise and menace one another from afar — or so I thought.

Jonathan Church's absorbing and sometimes fascinating revival of Pinter's 1979 adultery drama Betrayal is different. As well as sexual tension and intimations of violence, there is . . . kissing (the cast of three are in a bubble).

The play is regarded as Pinter's most autobiographical work, sketching his seven-year affair in the 1960s with Joan Bakewell, who was married to his friend Michael Bakewell, while he himself was married to Vivien Merchant. His theme is guilty denial and the painful paradox of cheating in the name of love.

Jonathan Church’s absorbing and sometimes fascinating revival of Pinter’s 1979 adultery drama Betrayal is different. As well as sexual tension and intimations of violence, there is . . . kissing (the cast of three are in a bubble)

Jonathan Church's absorbing and sometimes fascinating revival of Pinter's 1979 adultery drama Betrayal is different. As well as sexual tension and intimations of violence, there is . . . kissing (the cast of three are in a bubble)

It can feel quite mannered and even frigid today, and there is some queasy misogyny, too. 

But Church's production teases out the emotional nuance of Pinter's writing and catches the mathematics of guilt that drives, and ultimately destroys, the affair.

Edward Bennett, in the Pinter role of the man having an affair with his best friend's wife, brings emotional uncertainty to a part which in other hands could seem cold. Joseph Millson, meanwhile, is fascinatingly evasive as the wronged husband, cunningly testing his wife and best buddy while grimly swallowing his pride.

But Church’s production teases out the emotional nuance of Pinter’s writing and catches the mathematics of guilt that drives, and ultimately destroys, the affair

But Church's production teases out the emotional nuance of Pinter's writing and catches the mathematics of guilt that drives, and ultimately destroys, the affair

RELATED ARTICLES

Share this article

Share

Source : https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-8870621/Why-theatre-needs-kiss-life-PATRICK-MARMION-reviews-Betrayal.html

Here you can find information about how to track lost phone with imei number

Why theatre needs this kiss of life: PATRICK MARMION reviews Betrayal
Theatre reviews: Witches brew up Scottish play in a cauldron of visual effects
As theatre begins to renew itself, we must work out how critics engage with it
It's lousy being a luvvie: Riotous new history of the theatre reveals a litany of farce
Naked Boys Singing at The Garden Theatre | Review
Theatre reviews: Undocumented and Strange Rocks at Mull Theatre | In Someone Else's Shoes: Edinburgh at the Traverse
Dr Blood’s Old Travelling Show – Belgrade Theatre, Coventry
The Kenton Theatre Announce New Performances In Aid Of Their KENTON FOR KEEPS Fundraising Campaign
Uncle Vanya: Will Gompertz reviews Chekhov's play on film
BWW Review: VINCENT RIVER at The Curators Theatre Company
[LIMITED STOCK!] Related eBay Products

    404: Not Found